Constitutional Law I(C) — Syllabus
Spring 2014
Professor Schnably

Mandatory: Please make sure you are familiar with the Ground Rules and any others I mention in class. After reading the Ground Rules, please click here (or on the link on the Ground Rules page) to send an acknowledgment that you have read the Ground Rules. Each person in the class must do so by 4:00 pm Wednesday, January 15.

Books & Supplements; Past Exams

Dean’s Fellow: Samantha Moussa

Assignments

Syllabus

Note: For all the assignments in this syllabus, I suggest that you read over the questions about the material posted on the Current Assignments page before you begin reading the material, and then go over the questions after you have read the material. We may not discuss every single question posted on the Current Assignments page, and I may ask questions in class that I haven’t posted, but in general the questions on the page will reflect what we’re going to go over.

I.    Introduction to the Study of Constitutional Law

      A. Overview
          CB 1-7; Supp. 1-9 (Toobin article)
      B. Texts
          1. What Is the Best Text?
              a. The U.S. Constitution
                  CB xli-lvi (US Constitution); Supp. 10-11
              b. Other Constitutions
                  The U.S. Constitution, amended as proposed by Levin, CB xli-lvi and Supp. 12-22
                  The Canadian Constitution, Supp. 23-55
                  The South African Constitution, Supp. 56-136
                  Supp. 137-140 (Field, Williams articles)
          2.What Is the Authoritative Version of the Text of the U.S. Constitution?
              Supp. 141-163; CB 134-136 (note 4)
          3. Is a Constitution More than the Text?
              Supp. 164-167, 168-178 [Quebec case and statute]; CB 83-84 (Note 1, Advisory Opinions)
          4. Does the Text Govern Changes to the Text?
              CB xli-lvi (US Constitution)
              Supp. 179-198
              CB 134-136 (Note 4)
      C. The Adoption of the U.S. Constitution: Federalist and Anti-Federalist Perspectives
          CB 7-25; Supp. 199-202
      D. Interpreting the U.S. Constitution: Two Case Studies
          1. Heller v. District of Columbia
              CB 48-52; Supp. 203-204 (Liptak article)
          2. The Bank of the United States and the Powers of the Federal Government
              CB 53-65
              Supp. 205-215

II.    The Role of the Courts in the Constitutional Framework

      A. Introduction: The Power of Judicial Review
          1. Marbury v. Madison
              CB 25-38
              Supp. 205-212 (review), Supp. 216-219
          2. Martin v. Hunter’s Lessee; Judicial Exclusivity in Constitutional Interpretation
              CB 38-48
              Supp. 220-229
              Note: On Supp. 229, the last four words of line 2 should be “of a State in,” not “or a State in”. Corrected Supp. 229.
      B. The Uses of Judicial Review: Slavery
          CB 65-69, 453-464; CB xli, xliv, xlvii-xlviii [Art. I § 2 cl. 3, Art. I § 9 cl. 1; Art. IV §§ 2, 3]
      C. Limitations on the Powers of the Federal Courts
          1. Political Control of the Supreme Court
              CB 69-82, 155-158
              Supp. 230-231
          2. Advisory Opinions, Standing and the Political Question Doctrine
              a. Advisory Opinions
                  CB 82-84; CB xlvi (Art. II § 2 cl. 2)
              b. Standing
                  i. Allen v. Wright
                      CB 85-89
                  ii. Conceptualizing Injury; Widespread Injuries
                      CB 106-117 (through Note 4); CB xliii [Art. I § 6 cl. 2]
                  iii. Likelihood of Injury
                      a) Lujan
                          CB 89-97, 117-118 (Note 5)
                      b) Clapper
                          CB Supp. 1-11
                  iv. Massachusetts v. EPA; Newdow, Perry, and Windsor
                      CB 97-106, 118-121, CB Supp. 12-15
                  v. Standing to Challenge the Individual Mandate in the Health Care Bill
                      Supp. 232-233, 233A
              c. Political Question Doctrine
                  CB 121-141, CB xli, xliii [Art. I §§ 2,3,6,7], li-lii [14th Am. § 3]
              d. Standing and Political Question Doctrine: Two Case Studies
                  i. Common Cause v. Biden
                      Supp. 243-246
                  ii. Bush v. Gore
                      CB 142-153; CB xlv [Art. II § 1 cl. 2], CB l-li [Twelfth Amendment]
                      Supp. 234-242
              e. Ripeness & Mootness
                  CB 153-155

III.    The Separation of Powers

      A. Introduction
          CB 367-70
      B. Approaches to Determining the Distribution of Federal Powers
          CB 370-382
      C. The President, Congress, and Foreign Affairs
          1. Executive Authority in Foreign Affairs
              CB 382-389, 409-411
              Supp. 39 (Constitution Act, 1867 [Canada], § 132)
              Supp. 66, 114-115 (South African Constitution, § 39; §§ 231-233)
          2. The Use of Force

              CB 389-391 (through Note 1), 406-411
              Supp. 247-251 [the War Powers Resolution]
              Supp. 64-66, 70, 74, 77-79, 107-108
              (South African Constitution § 37; § 55; § 73; § 77; §§ 83-85; §§ 200-204)
          3. The “War on Terror”

              a. Hamdi v. Rumsfeld

                  CB 391 (Note 2)-400
              b. Hamdan,, Boumediene, and Other Issues
                  CB 400-406
      D. Domestic Affairs
          1. Executive Privilege, Impeachment, and Immunity
              CB 411-424; CB xliii [Art. I § 6 cl. 1]
          2. Nondelegation/Administrative Authority
              CB 424-429, 435-439
              Supp. 252-253 [Bush Administration bailout proposal]
          3. Administrative Agencies and the Separation of Powers
              a. Textualist/Strict Separation Approaches
                  i. INS v. Chadha
                      CB 429-435
                  ii. Bowsher and Metropolitan Airports
                      CB 439-441, 451 (Note 5)
                      Supp. 254
              b. Pragmatic Approaches
                  CB 441-451 (through Note 4)
          4. Recess Apppointments
              Supp. 255-273

IV.    Federalism: The Powers of the Federal Government

      A. The Purpose of the Commerce Clause / The First Period of Interpretation of the Commerce Clause
          CB 159-169, 172-175 (through Note 2), 177-179 (Notes 4-9)
          CB xliii-xlv (U.S. Const. Art. I §§ 8 and 10), xlviii (Art. VI), l-lii (Tenth and Fourteenth Amendments)
          Supp. 67-68 (South African Const. § 44(1)(ii)), Supp. 120-122 (Sched. 4 & 5), Supp. 92 (§ 146)
          Supp. 33-36 (Canadian Const. Act, 1867, Arts. 91-95 (focus on §§ 91 and 92))
      B. Before the New Deal: The Second Period of Interpretation of the Commerce Clause
          1. Limits on Congress’s Powers
              CB 179-185 (through “Note: Prohibiting Interstate Transportation”), CB 169-170
              CB 185-193 (through Note 4), CB 1555-1560
          2. Limits on State Powers: Lochner v. New York
              CB 750-766; CB 65-69 (Calder v. Bull, natural law) (review)
              CB xliii (Art. I § 8 cl. 3), CB xlv (Art. I § 10 cl. 1), CB li (Am. XIV, § 1)
      C. The New Deal and Its Legacy: The Third Period of Interpretation of the Commerce Clause
          CB 192 (Note 4)-198, 171-172, 198-203, 766-776
      D. Contemporary Interpretations of the Commerce Clause
          1. “Internal” Limits on the Scope of the Commerce Clause Power
              CB 203-218
          2. Health Care: The Individual Mandate
              CB 218-240
      E. Other Powers of Congress New!
          1. Taxing
              a. In General
                  CB 293-296
                  CB xliii (Art. I § 8 cl. 1); CB xli (Art. I § 2 cl. 3); CB lii (Am. XVI)
              b. Health Care: The Shared Responsibility Payment (Penalty)
                  CB 296-301
          2. Spending
              a. In General
                  CB 301-310
              b. Health Care: The Medicaid Expansion
                  CB 310-322
          3. Commandeering? The Tenth Amendment as an “External” Limit on Congress’s Powers
              CB 354-364 (through Note 7)
      F. Other Approaches to Federalism
          1. Structural Approaches
              CB 175-178 (through Note 4); CB 351-354
              Supp. 12-13 (“An Amendment to Restore the Senate”)
              Supp. 17-18 (“An Amendment to Limit the Federal Bureaucracy”)
              Supp. 19-20 (“An Amendment to Grant the States Authority to Check Congress”)
          2. Detailed Texts
              CB 364 (Note 8)
              Supp. 67-68 (South African Const. § 44(1)(ii)), Supp. 120-122 (Sched. 4 & 5), Supp. 92 (§ 146) (review)
              Supp. 33-36 (Canadian Const. Act, 1867, Arts. 91-95 (focus on §§ 91 and 92)) (review)

V. Federalism: Constitutional Limits on State Powers

      A. Introduction
          CB 240-247
      B. Strict Scrutiny of State Burdens or Restraints on Interstate Commerce
          CB 247-251, 256 (Note 3)
      C. Facially Neutral Statutes/Legislative Motivation
          CB 264-268, CB 509-510 (through first two lines) (Minnesota v. Clover Leaf Creamery), CB 273-278, 280 (Note 5)

 

 

 

 

 

 

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