International Human Rights Law (Fall 2012)

Professor Schnably

Ground Rules

You should be familiar with the following rules and any others I mention in class.


Seating Chart:

I will pass around a seating chart on the first day of class.  You must be on the seating chart to receive credit for the course. If you are not on the seating chart, I will not turn in a grade for you at the end of the semester, even if you take the exam. It is your responsibility to see to it that your name is on the seating chart. You must sit in your assigned seat for each class. If you would like to move to a different seat after the first day, just let me know and I’ll be happy to adjust the seating chart.

You must be on the seating chart to receive credit for the course. If you are not on the seating chart, I will not turn in a grade for you at the end of the semester, even if you take the exam. It is your responsibility to see to it that your name is on the seating chart.

Attendance:

Attendance is mandatory, as is preparation. Class discussion is crucial to your understanding of the materials. No more than five unexcused absences are permitted. If you have more than five unexcused absences, I may lower your grade for the course by half a grade. So long as your unexcused absences number five or fewer, being absent will have no effect on your grade. Of course, if you are absent you will miss the class discussion that day, and that may have an indirect impact. There is no set limit on excused absences (e.g., for illness), but if the number of excused absences becomes so great that in my judgment it calls into question whether you could learn the material covered in the course, I would talk to you and consult with the Dean of Students, and then reach a conclusion as to whether you may continue being enrolled in my class.

Procedure in case of absence: If you are absent for any class, please fill out one of the absence forms in the Dean of Students, which you can do on-line. It’s fine to e-mail me as well, but you must submit the Dean of Students form in any case. As for what constitutes an excused absence, these include:

My judgment in each case (based on the form you file with the Dean of Students Office) is final. No absence will be excused for any date the student is not present if the student does not file a form with the Dean of Students Office. You should file the form before the date you will be absent, if possible, or within a few days afterwards.

You must be on the seating chart to receive credit for the course. If you are not on the seating chart, I will not turn in a grade for you at the end of the semester, even if you take the exam. It is your responsibility to see to it that your name is on the seating chart. You must sit in your assigned seat for each class.

Class conduct:

Taping classes:

You may tape the class only with my prior permission.

Disability:

If you believe that you have a disability that might affect your ability to comply with any of these ground rules, please contact the Office of Disability Services.

Class e-mails: (optional)

I send e-mails to the class e-mail list created for this class. I will try to post anything in an e-mail on the web page, but there may be times when you will need to see the e-mails. (For example, I might occasionally change an assignment for the next day.)

The class e-mail list has everyone’s official law student e-mail address on it. A law student address looks like this: rgarcia@students.law.miami.edu (where the name of the student is Raul Garcia) or AB1234@students.law.miami.edu (where “AB” is the person’s initials and “1234” is the last four digits of the person’s C number).

You should either check your law student e-mail account regularly, or use e-mail forwarding to have e-mails sent to your law student e-mail forwarded to your preferred account (whether it’s gmail, hotmail, an undergraduate account, or some other account). (Note: there can be problems with forwarding, because some ISPs filter out forwarded e-mails unpredictably. Forwarding is very convenient if you prefer to use a non-law school account, but you may miss some e-mails depending on how your ISP handles forwarded messages.)

If you don’t regularly check your student account or use forwarding, you will miss not only my e-mails but also important e-mails from the Registrar, Dean of Students Office, Financial Aid, Career Planning, and elsewhere.

How to forward: Go to https://madison.law.miami.edu/emailforward/student_login.aspx and follow the instructions. Make sure you don’t mix this forwarding up with something different that you need to do. The University (not the Law School) gives you an e-mail alias (check page 17 of of the University IT User’s Guide). Your University alias will typically look like this: a.jones@umiami.edu, where “a” is the first initial, followed by a period, and “jones” is the last name. An alias is not an account; you can’t, for example, send anything from “a.jones@umiami.edu.” It is simply an e-mail address to which e-mail may be sent and then forwarded to an e-mail account you designate. The sole reason you have a University alias is that the University may want to send e-mails to all students, graduate and undergraduate, on all campuses. The University assigns every student on all campuses an e-mail alias, and uses this alias for e-mails to all students. This alias is not activated until you sign on to MyUM and tell the University to which account — it can be your law student account or a personal account — you’d like University messages that have been sent to your alias to be directed.

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