Professor Schnably’s Courses
 


 
Property (Law 014)
 
Course Description:   Property is a fascinating subject that will help you learn basic legal concepts and methods of analysis. The wide variety of topics covered makes it especially interesting. Parts of it are conceptual and theoretical. Other parts relate to everyday problems like landlord-tenant law or the sale of property. You’ll learn a range of skills -- reading cases, applying statutes, and solving problems.
Semester:   Fall 2014
Credits:   4
Meeting Times:   Monday, Wednesday, and Thursday at 2:00-3:20 pm.
Meeting Room:   F108
Office Hours:   Please check the Office Hours page. You may also contact me by e-mail to request an appointment.
Ground Rules:   You Must Read the Ground Rules Carefully Before the First Class
Dean’s Fellow:   Gina P. Villar (E-mail: gvillar@students.law.miami.edu)
Schedule of Dean’s Fellow Meetings
Casebook / Other Materials:  
  1. Dukeminier, Krier, et al., Property (8th ed. 2014) (referred to in this Assignment Sheet as "CB")
  2. Supplementary materials (referred to in this Assignment Sheet as “Supp.”):
    Note: For a paper copy you can print this out, or purchase a three-hole punch copy of it in a simple binder at the Copy Center (Library, Room B207 [map]).
Assignments:   Please see the Syllabus, which has a link to the Current Assignments page. On the Syllabus you will see the readings we will cover throughout the semester (though the later assignments are tentative, subject to adjustment.) On the Current Assignments page, you will see the assignments for the first week of class.
Final Exam:   The final exam will be closed book. The Final Exam Packet (2007-2012) is available here or at the Copy Center. New!
Final Grade:   The final grade will be based on (a) exams given during the semester, (b) a final exam, and (c) class participation. Separately from these factors, excessive absences may reduce your final grade. See the Ground Rules for details.

 

Back to the top

 

 

International Human Rights Law (Law 311A)
 

Course Description:   This course will examine international human rights agreements, international and regional human rights courts and tribunals, and international human rights organizations and bodies, both governmental and non-governmental. It will also cover issues relating to the nature of human rights (e.g., civil and political rights, economic and social rights, individual and collective rights). In addition, it will examine the role of international human rights law in domestic law.
Semester:   Fall 2014
Credits:   3
Meeting Times:   Monday and Wednesday, 11:00 am to 12:20 pm
Meeting Room:   F408
Office Hours:   Please check the Office Hours page. You may also contact me by e-mail to request an appointment.
Ground Rules:   You Must Read the Ground Rules Carefully Before the First Class
Casebook / Other Materials:  
  1. David Weissbrodt, et al., International Human Rights: Law, Policy, and Process (4th ed. 2009) (referred to in the Syllabus as "CB")
  2. Supplementary Readings (pp. 1-233) (referred to in the Syllabus as “Supp.”)
  3. Documentary Supplement (pp. 1-804) (referred to in the Syllabus as “DS”)

    Note:

    • For a paper copy you can print these out from the website, or purchase a three-hole punch copy of it in a simple binder at the Copy Center (Library, Room B207 [map]).
    • You can bring with you to class only those pages of the Supplementary Readings assigned for the day, if that’s easier.
    • You should always bring your casebook with you to class.
    • In class we will often refer to the Documentary Supplement, so you should have the entire Documentary Supplement available to you in all classes. For class, it’s fine to access it via a downloaded copy on your laptop, if you don’t want to carry it with you. But you should be aware of an issue related to the final exam, which will be open-book. To have access to the Supplementary Readings and the Documentary Supplement during the exam, you will need a printed copy, because the exam security software will not let you open these documents on your laptop.
Schedule of Classes, Exercises, and Assignments The Schedule of Assignments is available here.

The Schedule is updated periodically, so if you print it out you should check back to see if there is a corrected version or a more up-to-date version. The lower left hand corner of the Schedule indicates when it was last updated.

Note:

  • To see what you should prepare for each class, you should look at the Schedule, which gives the assigned readings. Typically we will focus on the questions at the beginning of each chapter of the casebook (or elsewhere in the text), but for a number of assignments I will post some additional Questions. We may not always get to all the Questions you find on the website, and we may discuss some things not listed in the Questions, but in general the Questions (together with those in the CB) indicate what I plan to go over, and they are certainly always worth thought before class.
  • In the Schedule, I list, in addition to readings from the Casebook and any Supplementary Readings, the treaties or other instruments which are relevant, with page numbers from the Documentary Supplement. What I expect you to do for each of those is look through the treaty/instrument to see in general what it covers, and then focus on the relevant provisions (which sometimes I may point out specifically; other times, you may need to decide that for yourself. In some instances, the casebook has relevant excerpts of a treaty, which can be convenient, but you shouldn’t skip looking through the whole treaty. One skill you should develop by the end of the course is the ability to parse a treaty/instrument -- to look through it and get a good, concrete idea of what it’s about without reading it through word by word.
  • You will see, looking through the Schedule, that the reading is a little uneven -- there are more assigned pages for some classes than others. As the Schedule indicates, the average number of pages per class will be 32.
Final Exam:   The final exam will be open-book. You may bring with you any written materials with you that you wish. I will expect you to have the Casebook, Supplement, and Documentary Supplement. You will not have access to these on your laptop; you need to have them in hard copy.

A packet of past final exams is available here. New!

Final Grade:   The final grade will be determined by the exam, class participation, and the role-playing exercise. In general, class participation may raise your grade by a half a grade (e.g., from B to B+), but not lower it. In addition, separately from the general class participation component, the role-playing exercise may raise your grade by half a grade, but not lower it. Consequently, two “bumps” up are possible. Finally, separately from performance on the final exam, class participation, and the in-class exercise excessive absences may lower your grade. See the Ground Rules for details.

 

Back to the top

 

 

Constitutional Law I(C) (Law 017C) (Spring 2015)
 

Course Description:   An introduction to constitutional interpretation and to the structural provisions of the constitution.
Semester:   Spring 2015
Credits:   4
Meeting Times:   TBA
Meeting Room:   TBA
Office Hours:   Please check the Office Hours page. You may also contact me by e-mail to request an appointment.
Ground Rules:   TBA
Dean’s Fellow:   TBA
Casebook / Other Materials:   TBA
Assignments:   TBA
Final Exam:   TBA

 

Back to the top