Professor Schnably’s Courses
Bio
 

 

U.S. Constitutional Law I(T) (Fall 2017)
 

Course Description:   An introduction to constitutional interpretation and to the structural provisions of the constitution.
Semester:   Fall 2017
Credits:   4
Meeting Times:   Monday, Tuesday, Thursday at 11:00-12:20 pm.
Meeting Room:   F200
Office Hours:   Please check the Office Hours page. You may also contact me by e-mail to request an appointment.
Ground Rules:   Mandatory: Please make sure you are familiar with the Ground Rules and any others I mention in class. Read them before the first class.
Dean’s Fellow:  
Casebook / Other Materials:   Please see the Syllabus page.
Assignments:   For the Syllabus and the Assignments, see the Syllabus page.
Final Exam & Grade:   The final exam will be open-book. The final grade will consist of the exam and any class participation credit (which can lower but not raise your grade), less any lowering of the grade for excessive absences. See the Ground Rules page for details).

 

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U.S. Constitutional Law II(A) (Law 217A) (Fall 2017)
 
Course Description:   This course covers the protection of individual rights under the U.S. Constitution. The major topics will be substantive due process (e.g., the right to privacy), equal protection, and the First Amendment. As we make our way through the materials, we will explore different methods of interpreting the Constitution, and engage in some brief comparisons with other systems.
Semester:   Fall 2017
Credits:   4
Meeting Times:   Tuesday and Thursday at 3:30-5:20 pm.
Meeting Room:   A110
Office Hours:   Please check the Office Hours page. You may also contact me by e-mail to request an appointment.
Ground Rules:   Mandatory: Please make sure you are familiar with the Ground Rules and any others I mention in class. Read them before the first class.
Casebook / Other Materials:   Please see the Syllabus page.
Assignments:   Please see the Syllabus, which has a link to the Current Assignments page. On the Syllabus you will see the readings we will cover throughout the semester (though the later assignments are tentative, subject to adjustment.) On the Current Assignments page, you will see the assignments for the first week of class.
Final Exam & Grade:   The final exam will be open book. The final grade will consist of the exam and any class participation credit (which can lower but not raise your grade), less any lowering of the grade for excessive absences. See the Ground Rules page for details).

 

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The Criminalization of Homelessness: Causes, Policy, and Practical Lawyering (Spring 2018)
 

Course Description:   This seminar will explore the criminalization of homelessness—policies in which local governments use systematic arrests of homeless people for relatively minor misdemeanors to drive them out of core urban areas. The seminar will have three major aims. The first is to examine the large-scale economic and social trends in inequality that contribute to homelessness, and the range of policy responses aimed at preventing or alleviating it. The second is to explore the contributions that civil rights litigation can make to supporting constructive policy responses, as well as the limits of litigation as an agent of social change. The third is to gain a practical lawyering sense of how social impact litigation is conducted, using as a case study the current consent decree in Pottinger v. City of Miami. That consent decree limits the power of the police to arrest homeless people for certain misdemeanor offenses they cannot avoid committing while homeless. Paper topics will be chosen by the students, but must be approved by the professor.
Semester:   Spring 2018
Credits:   2 (seminar)
Meeting Times:   Mondays 3:30-5:20 pm
Meeting Room:   TBA
Office Hours:   Please check the Office Hours page. You may also contact me by e-mail to request an appointment.

 

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